World War I American aviators and pilots

United States Air Service

USAS History
Summary 1917-1918
Lafayette Escadrille
N.124/Spa.124
1st Observation
1st, 12th, 50th, 88th
1st Pursuit Group
27th, 94th, 95th, 147th
1st Bombardment
96th, 11th, 20th
2nd Pursuit Group
13th, 22nd, 49th, 139th
3rd Pursuit Group
28th, 93rd, 103rd, 213th
4th Pursuit Group
17th, 148th, 25th, 141st
5th Pursuit Group
41st, 138th, 638th
3rd Air Park
255th
. List of Aces

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Aircraft

World War I fighter planes, bombers and observation planes Nieuport 28 Spad VII Spad XIII Fokker Dr.1 Albatros D.Va Fokker D.VII
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Related Links: Nieuport 28 | Spad VII | Spad XIII | Fokker D.VII and other German aircraft | Fokker Dr.1 | Albatros D.Va

 
Spad VII

Spad VII airplane
Georges Guynemer's "Vieux Charles" Spad VII (Le Bourget Air Museum)

The Spad VII was a great aircraft and was used by the Lafayette Escadrille along with various marks of Nieuports. When the unit moved to Ham in April, 1917, it transitioned from Nieuports to Spad VIIs; the name changed corres-pondingly from N.124 to Spa.124. When Spa.124 become the USAS 103rd Aero Squadron, it kept its Spad VIIs for a time before getting Spad XIIIs. A good number of Lafayette Flying Corps pilots such as Eugene Bullard flew Spad VIIs. Bullard flew 20 patrols in a Spad VII for French Escadrille Spa.93. He then flew numerous patrols in a Spad with Escadrille Spa.85 from September 13th to November 11, 1917. His Spad had an insignia lettered "All Blood Runs Red" and his nickname became the Black Swallow of Death. Bullard requested confirmations for shooting down a Pfalz and a Dr.I though neither was formally confirmed.

Spad VII airplane
Georges Guynemer's "Vieux Charles" Spad VII (Le Bourget Air Museum)

Spad VII airplane
Georges Guynemer's "Vieux Charles" Spad VII (Le Bourget Air Museum)

Spad VII airplane
Georges Guynemer's "Vieux Charles" Spad VII (Le Bourget Air Museum)

The Spad VII was also used in small numbers by certain Aero Squadrons such as the 141st Aero Squadron that went into combat as part of the 4th Pursuit Group. The 41st Aero Squadron and 638th Aero Squadron might have been equipped with Spad VII machines, an assumption made based on photos in front of Spad VIIs. Ace pilot Raymond Brooks had had a Spad VII, named Smith I and later two other Spads Smith II and Smith III.

The VII generally had the lines of the failed Spad SA C2, at least from the wings and the cockpit back. Its weakness was in maneuverability; the type could be out-turned by Nieuports and by several of its German opponents. The VII was one of the first fighter aircraft to use a V-engine (in this case a V-8) rather than the nearly universal rotary engines being used by all combatant nations. It lacked the agility of rotary powered aircraft, but it was surprisingly powerful. It could fly fast straight out and out dive more or less anything else in the skies. Its 140 horsepower engine and 125 mile per hour top speed made it a screamer for its day.

Related Links: Nieuport 28 | Spad VII | Spad XIII | Fokker D.VII and other German aircraft | Fokker Dr.1 | Albatros D.Va

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